Tag Archives: social determinants of health

Mutual aid

A view across Greenland Dock, London in teh early morning when is is dark, looking across at a misty view of Canary Wharf.

Joy is elusive this month. I leave home early and return after a long day in darkness. My sleep is broken and unrefreshing. My dreams are invaded by oxygen flow meters, masks, monitors, and breathless patients. I am tired, but that word is inadequate to describe the omnipresent fatigue that seeps into every cell of my body through the day, and which sleep fails to banish.

 

But there is hope. There is always hope. And right now it’s name is mutual aid.

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My health, my choice?

I spent this Christmas, as I’m sure many others did, over-indulging in rich foods and alcohol, and barely moving from the sofa. I made choices that were far from healthy, and take full responsibility for the resulting lethargy, bad skin and headache.

But on a larger scale, to what degree is an individual responsible for their health? It is all too easy to label the smoker with lung cancer, the alcoholic with liver failure or the obese patient with heart disease as culpable and look no further. And of course it is true that no-one held a gun to their head and made them smoke, drink, or eat to excess. But this view is dangerously narrow and simplistic. The actions of individuals and their health-related actions must be viewed within a broader social context. We act as individuals but we do not live in a vacuum.

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