Can we find the spirit of ’45 in 2013?

Today marks a defining moment in the history of Britain, but looking around you wouldn’t believe it. Today, April 1st 2013, sees the The Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) come into force.

The death certificate of the NHS, issued by the National Health Action Party

The death certificate of the NHS, issued by the National Health Action Party

Some still believe that those opposed to the HSCA are over-dramatic, reactionary or naive. They will probably dismiss the National Health Action Party as extreme and publicity-seeking as it has issued a death certificate for the NHS, citing the cause of death as the HSCA 2013, with contributing causes including Thatcherism and the failure of New Labour. But it is difficult to see how anything but extreme statements and gestures can capture the attention of the public. Our generation is standing by as the NHS is quietly privatised and I for one am ashamed.

In 1948 the Attlee Labour government founded the NHS “the greatest gift a nation ever gave itself.” Since then it has been gradually eroded and dismantled. The King’s Fund’s infographic depressingly visualises various points of attack by multiple governments, starting with the creation of the internal market in 1989 when Margaret Thatcher signed the paper “Working for patients”. New Labour also have a lot to answer for; their PFI legacy crippling many Trusts today. But no previous government has actually tried to privatise the NHS, knowing that there would be a public outcry. Cameron and Clegg have privatised by stealth; clouding their agenda in a language of ‘choice’ ‘clinician power’ and ‘patient centredness,’ and ensuring that the reform documents were so long and complex that no-one, including most Ministers, understood them. The British media failed to report the warnings of individual doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers, and the demands of traditionally silent bodies such as the Royal College of Physicians to drop the Bill.

Screen Shot 2013-04-01 at 18.33.01

The most worrying aspect of the reforms that come into force today are the Section 75 regulations, which state that all NHS services must be put out to competitive tender. This is not just allowing privatisation, it is mandating it. And all these profit-motivated private firms will be operating under the ‘brand’ of the NHS, so patients may not even know. Until the inevitable problems start to surface and it is too late.

Screen Shot 2013-04-01 at 18.34.44As I watched the welfare state being dismantled around me this week, I went to see Ken Loach’s film The Spirit of ’45 at The Barbican Cinema. It was a poignant reminder of a time full of hope and promise, and was a stark contrast to what I see today. In 1945 there seemed to be a collective vision of a society that could pull together for the benefit of all, with at least some people from all social classes believing that the State was a force for good, and that it had a responsibility to provide and protect the simple things most of us spend life striving for: purpose, dignity in work, family, safety, health, wellbeing, shelter, and comfort. 

Particularly powerful were interviews with doctors and patients who remembered a time before the NHS, when healthcare was only for the rich. In The Spirit of ’45 Dr Jacky Davis and Dr Jonathan Tomlinson, doctors working in the NHS today, talk eloquently about the doctor-patient relationship and about their fears about the future. Marketisation and competition change the relationship of doctors and patients to salesmen and consumers. I am no salesman and never will be.

The day after I saw The Spirit of ’45 I was on call in hospital. I was asked to speak to a patient about her medications before she went home, and quickly scanned through her notes before going to speak to her. She had had a tough few weeks, having been diagnosed with incurable (but treatable) lung cancer – only two weeks from having a chest x-ray revealing an unexpected abnormality to tissue diagnosis and treatment plan. This rapid diagnosis and treatment was an example of what happens every day in the NHS, and is a great example of the efficiency of our healthcare system, but it had left her little time to process the news. She was anxious about her medications prior to discharge so I spent a few minutes clarifying them and reassuring her.

As we ended the conversation she said thanks, and then hugged me tightly. It was nhs logoan unexpected level of physical contact and gratitude for a conversation that could only have lasted ten minutes. But it made me think. She wasn’t really thanking me. She was thanking the NHS: there for her from cradle to grave; at the most difficult time of her life; no questions asked; free at the point of need. Patients in the NHS are taken under the wing of an institution and cared for under an ideology. Today that ideology has suffered a fatal wound. Health is not a commodity, and markets will not make our NHS more efficient, more equitable or of higher quality.

Nye Bevan said “The NHS will last as long as there are folk left with the faith to fight for it”. As Owen Jones says “It is with huge regret that I must say that – however much faith we have – we did not fight to save it. The question now is – do we have enough faith to bring it back to life?”

As I look around the political landscape I fail to be inspired or energised by what I see. Attlee had vision, drive and a belief in the people.

I am looking for the Spirit of ’45 in 2013. Let me know if you find it.

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