Death Cafe Euston

Join me for an evening of discussion on death, dying, life and living at 1 Lancing Street next to Euston station. There will be tea. There will be cake. There will be time and space to talk about death, dying, grief, funerals, and the fragility of life.

Death Cafes provide an opportunity ‘to increase awareness of death with a view to helping people make the most of their (finite) lives‘. They are group directed discussions with no agenda, objectives or themes. They are discussion groups rather than grief support or counselling sessions. They are generally life-affirming events, but sensitive discussions are of course possible so please bear this in mind. For more information please see www.deathcafe.com.

Everyone is welcome, but please book a ticket in advance via EventBrite as there is limited space. Camden Foodbank (working under the umbrella of The Trussel Trust) are kindly donating their lovely space for this event and I will be providing tea and cake. To thank the foodbank for supporting this event, I am asking attendees to bring a donation instead of paying for a ticket. You can find a list of items that foodbanks need on the Trussel Trust website, but Camden Foodbank are currently in particular need of tinned meat (eg corned beef), long-life juice, sugar, coffee, shower gel and shaving foam.

This event is part of Dying Matters Awareness Week, placing the importance of talking about dying, death and bereavement firmly on the national agenda. The 2017 Awareness Week runs from 8-14th May and is themed ‘What can you do?’ encouraging everyone of every age to get more active in planning for dying and death and helping support those who may need it in times of grief and bereavement, be they friends, family or in the wider community. I have talked a lot about witnessing death in hospital and my belief that conversations about death and dying must be taken outside healthcare settings. Death Cafes are one way that we can engage with our own mortality, think about what we would want at the end of life, and find the language to support those close to us experiencing illness, loss and grief. Conversations are varied, and have previously included: beliefs about what happens after death; how to live a ‘good life’; what makes a meaningful funeral; how to face fear of death; how to support someone affected by suicide of a loved one; how faith and religion help or hinder dealing with loss; views on assisted dying; what an ethical burial is; what is in an advance directive; cryogenics, and whether science will ever mean we live forever.

Come along with an open mind. You are promised an interesting, lively and life-affirming evening.

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