Tag Archives: patient

Life in my shoes

On a recent set of on call shifts I met James,* who my team treated for pulmonary emboli. He was a lovely man; visits to check he was on enough oxygen to maintain his saturations and to assess his haemodynamic status were a joy, due to his easy manner and good humour.

Pulse Oximeter, for monitoring oxygen saturations

One one occasion I was with my Consultant, who had known James for a while prior to this admission. At the end of the consultation he asked a very powerful question “is there anything else on your mind?” At this point I was closing the notes folder and putting my pen in my pocket, expecting to move on to the next patient. But James  did have something on his mind.

What I have not mentioned is that James is HIV positive. He has been living with HIV for many years and facing the challenges associated with this with resolve and good humour. His current problem was not directly related to his HIV status, but as is the usual practice whilst he was in hospital he was cared for by both the general medical team, and the “immune deficiency team” who were able to advise on potential interactions with his ARVs and give other specialist input.

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How to die: CPR and the concept of futility

I recently cared for Ernest,* an 87 year old gentleman who spent around two weeks on my ward. Prior to admission his health was poor. He was bed-bound due to the late stages of a degenerative neurological disease, and had associated cognitive impairment. He had several other health complaints, and had been in hospital multiple times in the previous year with infections. He had always responded to antibiotics but his condition and level of interaction with the world had declined with each admission. On arrival to our ward I noticed that he did not have a DNAR order and, since he was not able to discuss his wishes, I looked to the family for information and to broach this subject. I was surprised to find that several vocal family members were adamantly against a DNAR. I had lengthy discussions explaining my reasons for believing that attempts at resuscitation would be futile and that setting limits of care was important to ensure we pursued quality, not just quantity of life. They listened, seemed to understand, and themselves identified his frailty, deterioration over the last year, and decline in his quality of life. However they strongly objected to us making him “not for attempted resuscitation.” As the end of the week approached I felt uncomfortable about the lack of a DNAR order, and about the possibility of this frail gentleman suffering a brutal and undignified exit to the world should his heart stop.

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A Grief Encounter

Last week was particularly stressful; marked by staff shortages, anguished relatives, conflict over complex discharge processes, and pressure to create beds. The amount of time I spent with each patient on my ward rounds was less that what I, or they, would have wanted but despite coming in early and leaving late there are only so many hours in a day. In weeks like these I often feel guilty as I leave work that I am unable to give more time to those patients and relatives facing the end of life.

More than many other people I know, I am acutely aware of the fragility of life.

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Discharges in the dead of night

NHS Hospital discharges: thousands claimed to occur overnight

The news this week has been full of horror stories of patients being discharged from hospital in the dead of night. “Where is the compassion?” they cried, “How could they, the supposed caring profession?”  The stories began after The Times discovered, via Freedom of Information requests, that 100 NHS trusts sent 239,233 patients home last year between 11pm and 6am

The immediate response of the press was to paint a picture of an army of ambulance drivers booting out frail 90 year olds; dumping them at their front doors, alone in the dead of night. This dramatic depiction fuelled discussions on various forums and news programmes. The callers on Radio 4s “Any answers” actually made me turn the radio off.

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The Dangers of DIY Diagnosis

I spend all day talking to patients about their health and disease, explaining the rationale for tests and discussing the possible outcomes of different treatment strategies. This is often difficult and complex. I struggle to articulate risk, uncertainty, and the art of medicine; the shades of grey that are a day to day reality, and which medical school does not necessarily prepare you for.  I was therefore outraged when, on my way home after a hard day at work, I saw this advert on the Tube:

An advert on London Underground for an over the counter blood test.

I should sue Myrios for emotional distress: I almost fell onto the tracks. What shocked me was the cynical, and cheerful, exploitation of people’s worries about their health.

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An alternative day: how technology could enhance healthcare

Real day: 

I arrive at work, and quickly check my emails on my phone before I enter the signal black hole that is the hospital where I spend my working life. The SHO is not in yet, so I persuade the ward clerk to briefly give up one of only 3 functional computers on the ward and update the patient list with the details of the 2 new patients, whose names are scrawled onto the whiteboard. I skim through their notes, and cast my eyes over them to make sure nothing urgent is required. I leave a note for the SHO requesting her to arrange some tests, before I go to the secretaries’ office to hunt for a working dictaphone and a spare tape.

I arrive in outpatient clinic 15minutes before the first patient’s appointment and turn on the PC. I find the printed lists of the expected patients and pick up the first set of notes, searching through the years of mis-filing to find the referral letter. I finally find it in between a yellowing letter from Ophthalmology in 1994 and one from General Surgery in 1990 that I’m sure was typed on a typewriter.

This closely resembles my NHS clinic computer

By the time I have read the referral letter the computer has loaded up as far as the login screen. I enter my details, listen to it whir, and watch the egg timer turn over and over. I call in the patient and start the consultation as I wait for the screenprompts to enter separate passwords for the Radiology and Pathology applications. I take a history and perform a physical examination. I finally get access to laboratory tests, but have to filter the results in several different ways to get all the results I need. I can then finally look at some recent imaging, although I can’t compare this to old xrays as they have been archived and I don’t have time to ask the computer system to retrieve them from the data store as this has all taken quite a while and there are many patients waiting in the corridor.

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Do you have a right to die?

I like to think that I am in control of my life and get very frustrated when this control is taken away, even in trivial ways: when train delays make me late, when I am waiting for an interview panel to decide whether to employ me or when a relationship ends and I am on the receiving end of the “it’s not you, it’s me” speech. I often wonder how I would react to something more serious and substantial being taken out of my control. Something such as my health, my independence or my autonomy.

Autonomy and rights are a common focus of discussion, especially as we have moved from a paternalistic to a partnership model between the doctor and patient. Such issues have become central to the debate surrounding physician-assisted suicide and assisted dying. Do we have a right to choose the timing and manner of something so fundamental as our own death? To what degree do the wishes of an individual have to come second to the perceived adverse effects on society?

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